Our Fantasy Triathlon Gear List

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Football season is officially underway, which means many fantasy football leagues are just now racking up their first wins and losses. While we know brands and organizations have their own fantasy triathlon programs, we decided to take it a different route with a—drumroll, please—fantasy triathlon gear list

No, we're not sitting around a table selecting picks, but rather we've compiled 10 pieces of triathlon gear we'd love to train and race with if money was no object. You know, the kind of list we all mentally make after we see images of pros using the newest tech on the Big Island. 

We're keeping this streamlined—leaving out little accessories like swim caps and running socks and only going for the big-ticket items.

From a pair of goggles with a heads-up display integrated into the design to a state-of-the-art full-body recovery system, here's what dream triathlon gear we'd purchase if we found $23,154 between the couch cushions.

Let us know what you'd include in your dream triathlon gear setup in the comment section below! 

Form Swim Goggles

$199

Of course we weren't going to pick just any common pair of goggles. This new pair from Form is changing the way triathletes train in the pool by incorporating a heads-up smart display on the right lens. You can customize the metrics to include anything from split times to distance, depending on your preferences. 

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Pearl Izumi Tri Octane Suit

$350

Designed for Pearl Izumi's sponsored professional athletes and later released to the public, the Tri Octane Suit includes some seriously impressive tech. It's constructed with aerodynamic material on the sleeves and the back to optimize airflow, and the fast-drying chamois not only offers plenty of protection, but it won't hinder freedom of movement.  

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ROKA Maverick X Wetsuit

$950

Endorsed by the likes of eight-time World Champion Javier Gómez, ROKA's thoughtfully designed triathlon wetsuits have made a strong impression on the professional ranks in a short amount of time. The shoulders feature ROKA's ARMS-UP technology, which virtually eliminates any shoulder restriction, and the centerline design promotes optimal body rotation in the water. 

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Garmin Forerunner 945

$750

The old idiom "everything but the kitchen sink" rings true when it comes to the Garmin Forerunner 945. It's the ultimate multisport GPS watch—it can track and monitor all the usual triathlon metrics yet also sync music from your phone and store songs to pair with Bluetooth headphones. The full-color display and onboard maps are stand-out features as well. 

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Oakley Aro7 Helmet

$500

Remember the pointy alien-like aero helmets that were all the rage the past couple decades? They're only truly effective if you have your head in the optimal position, and unless you're a professional, it's unlikely you've done any wind tunnel testing to find out. The Aro7 helmet from Oakley takes a real-world approach to aerodynamics (taken from racecars), accounting for the various head positions triathletes will hold throughout 112 miles on the bike. 

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Cervelo P5X Dura-Ace DI2

$16,000

The 2019 Cervelo P5X Dura-Ace DI2 is the superbike of superbikes, and it's no surprise why it's the most popular brand on the Big Island. From the aero lightweight carbon frame and deep section carbon wheels to the top-shelf groupset and accessories, there's literally nothing to upgrade—except for a power meter of course. 

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S-Works Trivent Triathlon Shoes

$400

It's hard to argue with anything Specialized makes, and it offers products that would make great substitutes for several categories on this list. The S-Works Trivent triathlon shoes have been a favorite for a long time due to their lightweight constriction, stiffness and features like the Boa closure system to make transition a breeze. 

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POC DO Half Blade Clarity

$260

A good pair of sunglasses is often one of the most overlooked pieces of gear in a triathlete's arsenal. The POC DO Half Blade Clarity was designed to be both lightweight and durable, and the ability to swap out lenses allows you to customize the tint for whatever conditions race day throws at you. The rubber on both the nose piece and frame help keep them in place, too, especially when in the aero position. 

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Nike Vaporfly 4% Flyknit Running Shoe

$250

While not a triathlon-specific shoe, the Nike Vaporfly was used in its well-publicized effort to beat the two-hour marathon barrier (getting impressively close, too). Nike claims the responsive foam soles paired with the full-length carbon plate will maximize energy return, fostering a quicker turnover and resulting in a "snappier" running experience.

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Normatec Pulse Pro 2.0

$3,495

Since money is no object, we're not stopping with training and racing gear. As all triathletes know, recovery is an essential part of triathlon, so we picked the complete full-body recovery system from Normatec. Used by almost all professional triathletes, this system includes everything you need and more—the control unit, hosing, power supply, two leg attachments, two arm attachments and a hip attachment.

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