5 Pro Tips You Shouldn't Follow

Cyclists can learn a lot from watching pros. But that doesn't mean you should always ride and train like them. Alison Tetrick of Team Twenty16 explains what makes sense in the real world.

The Pro Way:

Stick to the training plan no matter what.

Do This Instead:

If you're riding with friends and feel awesome, it's okay to go longer and harder than you intended. On the flip side, you don't have to keep pushing when you feel lousy. Go hard on the days you feel strong, keep it mellow when you're tired, and stay off the bike as much as you need to without guilt—until you're ready to get back on.

7 Training Mistakes You Make When Getting Back In Shape

The Pro Way:

Use only the gear supplied by sponsors.

Do This Instead:

Don't get me wrong, I love all my sponsors and equipment. But when it comes to outfitting yourself, the fact that you pay for gear means you are not limited to any brand. Take advantage of the range of choices. Say the chamois in your new bibs rubs you the wrong way: Nothing is stopping you from trying a different one. When you're shopping for a bike, test-ride a variety until you find one that fits well and suits your strengths, riding style, color preference and performance goals.

10 Outrageously Expensive Bikes

The Pro Way:

Count (almost) every calorie.

Do This Instead:

As long as you raise your glass to moderation and follow a balanced diet most of the time, you are free to contend your local Donut Derby or turn a long ride into an event with multiple hot-dog stops—without having to worry about losing marginal gains.

More: 10 Weight Loss Tips From Pro Cyclists

  • 1
  • of
  • 2
NEXT

About the Author

Bicycling

Bicycling.com extends the credibility and authority of the world's leading cycling magazine online with web exclusive content and interactive features that help affluent cycling enthusiasts get the most out of every ride.
Bicycling.com extends the credibility and authority of the world's leading cycling magazine online with web exclusive content and interactive features that help affluent cycling enthusiasts get the most out of every ride.

Discuss This Article