The Most Anticipated Triathlon Bikes for 2020

Superbikes, dream bikes and our picks for realistic entry- and mid-level rides make our list of most anticipated rides for the upcoming year. And while some bikes are completely new, others are refinements of proven race machines.
 

1-cervelo-px-series

Cervélo PX Series, $5,500-$12,000

Cervélo appears to be converging multiple lines of triathlon bikes, taking elements of the P5x and P3x, and merging the best designs and features from each. Fully integrated storage, disc brakes and top-tier wheel and component packages from SRAM or Shimano make this a must-have bike for any serious triathlete.

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2-cervelo-p-series

Cervélo P Series, $2,500-$7,000

Offering a traditional frame shape, the Cervélo P Series also includes disc brakes, a one-by option and integrated hydration and storage for long course training and racing needs. The P Series is a great value and a top-level performer at half the cost of many premier bikes.

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3-Specialized-Shiv-TT

Specialized Shiv TT Disc, $13,000

If you caught a glimpse of Lucy Charles-Barclay riding at the front of the women's pack at the 2019 IRONMAN World Championship, you might have noticed her on a Specialized Shiv TT Disc. The hard-to-miss, rear-mounted Fuelcell hydration storage smooths airflow coming off of the rider to reduce speed-sapping drag. The innovative shape of the fork with a wide profile under an easy-to-adjust cockpit adds further speed and comfort benefits.

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Canyon Speedmax CF SLX 9.0 LTD, $9,999

The German-made Canyon Speedmax CF SLX 9.0 LTD is a tri bike without compromise: Shimano Dura-Ace components and Zipp 858NSW wheels check all the boxes on a triathlete's wish list on this all-aero bike. Canyon eschews disc brakes for the tried and true rim-brake technology.

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5-Trek-SpeedConcept

Trek Speed Concept, $3,799-$4,299

The Trek SpeedConcept makes the "we want it" list due to its aerodynamic superiority—it was way ahead of its time when it launched several years ago—range of sizes, nearly infinite adjustability and multitude of customizable configuration options available through the Trek ProjectOne program.

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Pinarello Bolide TR+, $16,099

Sparing no expense, the Pinarello Bolide TR+ leads the field, quite literally: The Pinarello Bolide has several times come within just a few minutes of the 4-hour mark for the bike split in the 140.6 distance. Features include a 3D-printed cockpit and bento box, asymmetrical aerodynamic frame shapes and SRAM or Shimano component groups featuring hydraulic disc brakes. The Pinarello Bolide TR+ is available in four sizes, starting at 48.5 cm and has been engineered with a lower bottom bracket and lower standover height.

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7-Felt-IA-FRD-Disc

Felt IA FRD Disc, $15,999

Years ago, before integration was standard on triathlon superbikes, Felt was hiding brakes and bento boxes out of the wind. The Felt IA FRD refines previous designs and continues to be the bike of choice of some of the fastest women in the pro field. The TexTreme carbon not only gives this bike the unique checkerboard appearance, it also affords additional stiffness without extra material or weight.

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8-liv-avow-advanced

Liv Avow Advanced, $2,400

The Liv Avow Advanced is a women's specific tri bike that sacrifices nothing. Frame geometries are scaled appropriately—not just made smaller—to offer comfort and precise handling. The Shimano 105 drivetrain is reliable and offers precision shifting while the Tektro brakes offer confidence-inspiring braking.

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9-giant-trinity-advanced-pro2

Giant Trinity Advanced, $3,600

Taking cues and inheriting trickle-down tech from bikes with premium price tags, the Giant Trinity Advanced is an excellent option for beginners and seasoned triathletes alike. Now available for the masses: hidden rim-brakes, hydration and storage options that work seamlessly with the bike frame, as well as a lightweight and high-performing component group from Shimano.

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10-Ventum-Z-Mechanical

Ventum Z Mechanical, $3,500

You won't go unnoticed on this unusually shaped frame—sans downtube—from Ventum. The design of the Ventum Z offers comfort through compliance, as well as the aerodynamic benefits of no downtube. Mechanical shifting offered by the Shimano component group is precise and offers a pleasing feel when shifting. The integrated hydration container is available in a variety of color options and stores 1.4L of liquid.

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11-quintana-roo-pr-four-disc

Quintana Roo PR4 Disc, $2,677-$4,335

The Quinata Roo PR4 Disc offers more bike for a moderate price tag compared with other boutique brands. The asymmetrical chainstays provide positive power transfer and efficient aerodynamics. Mechanical disc brakes mean there's no need to maintain a hydraulic oil system, yet they still provide superior stopping power in all conditions. A behind-the-saddle storage container, as well as a top-tube bento box, make this a bike suitable for any distance race or training session.

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READ THIS NEXT: The Most Anticipated Triathlon Bikes of 2019

About the Author

Greg Kaplan,

A lifelong endurance sports athlete, Greg raced bikes on the road as a junior prior to changing his athletic focus to rowing. Upon retiring from elite rowing competition, Greg revisited his passion for racing bikes and also added some swimming and running into the mix, competing at the ITU Age Group World Championships on multiple occasions. He and his wife Shannon—also a rower, bike-racer, and triathlete—enjoy traveling, learning about wine and keeping up with their rescue cats when they are not training or racing.
A lifelong endurance sports athlete, Greg raced bikes on the road as a junior prior to changing his athletic focus to rowing. Upon retiring from elite rowing competition, Greg revisited his passion for racing bikes and also added some swimming and running into the mix, competing at the ITU Age Group World Championships on multiple occasions. He and his wife Shannon—also a rower, bike-racer, and triathlete—enjoy traveling, learning about wine and keeping up with their rescue cats when they are not training or racing.

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