7 Excuses Not to Use at Your Next Triathlon

3. "Everyone is so much faster than me, so I'll make a fool of myself." Competition excusi does a good job at manipulating ones eye sight so that everyone but you looks fast. They may indeed be faster than you, but keep in mind that their speed is out of your control. Triathlons accept and embrace all times, and regardless if you are the first racer across the finish line or the last, you still have done an amazing event.

More: Tips to Get Faster

4. "My equipment is so old, everyone will blow right past me." Although your trusty bike may have successfully carried through miles of training, the virus makes it appear like a bucket of bolts along side the $10,000 time machine next to it in transition. While it may indeed be more aerodynamic and cutting edge, that does not make up for lack of training. Remember though that it is the well tuned engine that rides the bike that is more important than any carbon fiber attachment.

5. "I'm not at your racing weight. Lose five more pounds then I'll be ready." This disease seems to manipulate our minds when we look in the mirror. Instead of seeing an athlete who has done the training, we still see an unfit coach potato. Once again, it is the disease playing games with our head. Triathlon is blind to body image and embraces all sizes, shapes, and forms as long as you have trained and have the will to succeed. Focusing on a healthy diet in your training can help you avoid this symptom.

More: Reach Your Racing Weight the Right Way

6. "I don't have the genes and wasn't born to be an athlete." Genetically, you may not be Lance Armstrong or have to a super high VO2 max, but in countless studies, these measures of an athlete cannot compare to an athlete's commitment to practice. When you put your mind to a task and achieving a goal, there can be no stopping you. Trust your body and it will take you to amazing places

7. "I didn't grow up swimming, who am I trying to fool doing an open water triathlon?" This one is related to #6. Most triathletes actually did not grow up doing a lot of swimming, many of your fellow competitors just learned to swim properly specifically for this race. Trust that you put in the practice in the water, and while you're stroke may not be "perfect," this is what you will go with on this race, and this is what you will build upon.

This disease can kill your race if you let it. But if you treat these symptoms with a dose of confidence, realism and focused practice beforehand, you will avoid it at all costs- and get the maximum enjoyment out of your races.

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About the Author

Kevin Koskella

Kevin coaches sessions for Masters swimming and triathletes in San Diego, and conducts a variety of clinics, private lessons and video-analysis of personal swim style with critique and correction. He has helped professional Ironman triathletes reach their goal, but his passion is to give the new triathlete the confidence to be successful in the swim portion of the race. He also runs the websites www.triswimcoachonline.com and www.triswimcoach.com, where you can find his products, including The Essential Triathlon Swimming DVD and The Complete Guide to Triathlon Swimming.
Kevin coaches sessions for Masters swimming and triathletes in San Diego, and conducts a variety of clinics, private lessons and video-analysis of personal swim style with critique and correction. He has helped professional Ironman triathletes reach their goal, but his passion is to give the new triathlete the confidence to be successful in the swim portion of the race. He also runs the websites www.triswimcoachonline.com and www.triswimcoach.com, where you can find his products, including The Essential Triathlon Swimming DVD and The Complete Guide to Triathlon Swimming.

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