Should You Run Every Day?

Cons

Running streaks are fun, but they're not without their pitfalls. For one, they don't allow for a complete rest day--something that might be necessary during intense training. If you've got strenuous workouts and high mileage on your schedule, a running streak is probably not for you.  

A streak might be counterintuitive if your goal is to get faster or train for a long race.

Also, some days maintaining the streak will feel really, really hard. Whether it's a bout with the stomach flu or a nagging injury, an entire day of traveling or two feet of snow, there will be challenges during a running streak. On those days, just commit to running the bare minimum or, depending on the extremity of the situation, don't run at all. If you feel like you couldn't break the streak without extreme guilt, no matter what's going on, you might want to commit to a different, more forgiving goal. 

A streak might also be counterintuitive if your goal is to get faster or train for a long race. Running a mile each and every day will get you into a great routine, but a streak won't magically transform your running performance. If you're looking to run a PR or tackle a new distance, you might be better served with a mix of race-specific workouts, cross-training and rest days.

It doesn't allow for flexibility, either. Running is supposed to be fun, but if you're constantly stressing about where and when and how you'll fit in your daily run, a streak might be more trouble than its worth.

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About the Author

Megan Harrington

Megan is a writer and RRCA certified running coach who lives and trains in rural upstate New York. She ran track and cross-country competitively in high school and college and now focuses on the half-marathon and marathon distance. When she's not running, Megan enjoys coaching fellow runners (www.runnerskitchen.com), snow-shoeing, hiking and digging around in her garden.
Megan is a writer and RRCA certified running coach who lives and trains in rural upstate New York. She ran track and cross-country competitively in high school and college and now focuses on the half-marathon and marathon distance. When she's not running, Megan enjoys coaching fellow runners (www.runnerskitchen.com), snow-shoeing, hiking and digging around in her garden.

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