6 Common RV Repairs You Can Do on the Road

Problem #4: Leaky Roof, Vents and Windows

Whether you're on the road or not, your RV's exterior surfaces take a beating from UV rays and weather unless you use an RV cover. And nothing puts a damper on a camping trip faster than trying to keep everything inside your rig dry as water drips inside.

How to avoid: If you can't keep your RV covered and it has a rubber membrane roof, inspect it monthly for signs of weather damage. Keep the roof clean of debris and use a rubber roof maintenance coating to protect it. Coating kits can be purchased at most RV supply stores.

Be aware of low-hanging branches, signs or lights that can puncture holes in the membrane.
Plastic roof vents will deteriorate with exposure and age and can be damaged by low obstructions. Check the vents for any damage and repair or replace as needed. Seal around the mounting flanges with RV sealant.

Likewise, seals around windows can breakdown, causing leaks that let in moisture, dirt, heat and cold. Check the seals at least twice a year for damage.

How to fix: For leaks in your rubber roof, there are a number of roof patch kits you can purchase. Be careful to buy the right one for your type of roof. Make a temporary repair on the road with special RV roof sealing tape. Go back later and make sure the mounting flanges around roof vents, breather caps and antennas are sealed tight using sealant made for RVs.

If a roof vent is cracked or otherwise damaged, either from exposure or a tree branch, the best course of action is to replace it. You may be able to use a clean plastic trash bag and duct tape for emergency repairs, but repair it right the first chance you get to protect your RV's interior.

For windows, if it's just the gasket material around the window frame that's leaking, remove the window, clean off the old seal, apply new sealant and install the window. If the window is cracked or broken, however, you'll either have to order a replacement from the factory or take your rig to an RV repair station, as most auto glass shops aren't equipped for RVs.

More: Best State Parks for RV Camping

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About the Author

Jeff Adams

Jeff Adams is a California-based freelance writer, contributor to ReserveAmerica.com and an avid camping enthusiast. He's been dragging his trailer and willing family around the western U.S. for more than a decade.
Jeff Adams is a California-based freelance writer, contributor to ReserveAmerica.com and an avid camping enthusiast. He's been dragging his trailer and willing family around the western U.S. for more than a decade.

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