6 Steps for Cleaning out Your Gear Closet

old shoes


Most of us have a bin, closet, drawer or maybe even half the garage filled with training equipment, clothing, shoes and random bits of other gear. Maybe you use it all, but more likely it’s a mix of your daily use items, race specials, retired pieces and purchases made in excitement that never got utilized. While many of us are spending more time at home and the weather is warming, it’s a great time to spring clean your athletic gear for a fresh, motivating restart.

Prep

First, set aside a good chunk of time for this. Before getting started, grab some sticky notes and a pen, a few bins or boxes, put on some music and fill up a water bottle. This task will require some discipline, organization and motivation—and hydration never hurts. Then, dig in and get going.

Ask How Often It’s Used

Place items into piles based on how often they’re used and what they’re used for. With athletics, there are certain items that might only be used twice a year (like a race number belt) but are still vital to your athletic goals while there are others that you hold onto but haven’t used in a year (that T-shirt with the hole). Just because you use something often doesn’t necessarily mean you should keep it, but this will help you start to sort through the massive pile.

Assess the Worth

There might be a bike you no longer use, but the resale value is nowhere near worth selling it for. If you have the space, hold on to these items as they can be great replacements if ever needed. Other items like race t-shirts and medals have sentimental value which should be considered. Think about the memory and if it was a big moment, hang on to the physical evidence, if not, say goodbye! Use your sticky notes here to put values on items you are unsure about. Some might be worth selling while others should be donated or even tossed.

Ask If Replacing It Would Help

This process is not simply about tossing things, it is about creating a collection that enhances your athletic goals. If you have things, even if used often, that are older models, heavy, torn or are poor quality, it could be a big boost to your performance to replace them with better, newer versions. Put sticky notes on these items and then do some research to see if you are able to replace them and what the benefits of replacing them might be.

Renew It

Before you put things away, make your old gear new again! Give clothing a fresh wash, wipe down dusty gear, make notes of items that could be useful if a small part was replaced and then organize it in a way that screams LET’S DO THIS!

Deal With the Rest

You’re not done yet. Deciding to part with gear isn’t enough, you have to actually let it go. Spend time finding a good home for gently used items. Clothes or shoes in good condition that no longer fit your body or needs can be valuable to others. Contact a local fitness shop or youth group to see if they take donations. Super worn items or race medals can be put to new use with recycling programs. Consult Google to see if your items can be reincarnated. Any gear capable of earning money should be immediately photographed and listed for sale on your platform of choice. The rest, well, grab that trash bag!

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About the Author

Lori Russell

Lori Russell is a self-taught personal chef and qualified board-certified sports dietitian-nutritionist. She holds a master’s degree in human nutrition and has racked up over 11 years professional experience in the dynamic field of wellness, including recipe demonstrator, corporate wellness coach, public speaker, digital media producer, personal nutrition advisor and freelance writer. As an elite road cyclist and marathon runner who was diagnosed with celiac disease, Russell understands first hand that eating a whole food, nutritious diet can greatly affect one’s performance, mood, health and overall increase quality of life. Through her brand ‘Hungry for Results@HungryForResults, she provides a fun and authentic approach to food, nutrition, fitness and lifestyle counseling.
Lori Russell is a self-taught personal chef and qualified board-certified sports dietitian-nutritionist. She holds a master’s degree in human nutrition and has racked up over 11 years professional experience in the dynamic field of wellness, including recipe demonstrator, corporate wellness coach, public speaker, digital media producer, personal nutrition advisor and freelance writer. As an elite road cyclist and marathon runner who was diagnosed with celiac disease, Russell understands first hand that eating a whole food, nutritious diet can greatly affect one’s performance, mood, health and overall increase quality of life. Through her brand ‘Hungry for Results@HungryForResults, she provides a fun and authentic approach to food, nutrition, fitness and lifestyle counseling.

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