4 Stretches For Common Sports Injuries

Injury: Shoulder Impingement

A shoulder impingement, or rotator cuff tendonitis, is a common injury for swimmers, overhead ball throwers and racquet sport enthusiasts. It occurs when the tendons or bursa surrounding the shoulder rub against the shoulder blade itself. It usually starts as a dull ache but if left untreated it can sideline you for several weeks and in severe cases can even lead to surgery. The supraspinatus, a small muscle in the upper back that runs from the shoulder blade to the humerus, is often where the tightness and inflammation of shoulder impingement begins. The supraspinatus stretch will feel awkward at first as it's a small and hard muscle to reach, but you'll notice its positive effects almost immediately afterward.

Stretch: Supraspinatus stretch

Supraspinatus stretch-1Supraspinatus stretch-2

Place your right hand on your right hip and rotate your arm so that your elbow is facing forward. Take your left hand and hold onto your right arm to gently pull it more forward until you feel a good stretch. Hold this position for 30 sections before switching sides.

More: 3 Exercises to Strengthen Your Shoulders

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About the Author

Susan Grant Legacki

Susan Grant Legacki is the founding editor of LAVA Magazine, and currently serves as the magazine's features and online editor. Prior to joining LAVA, she worked as a Senior Editor at Inside Triathlon and Triathlete Magazine. She is an Ironman finisher, Boston-qualifying marathoner, certified Pilates instructor—and a fitness and nutrition enthusiast. You can read more about her on Susanegrant.com and follow her on Twitter at @susanglegacki.
Susan Grant Legacki is the founding editor of LAVA Magazine, and currently serves as the magazine's features and online editor. Prior to joining LAVA, she worked as a Senior Editor at Inside Triathlon and Triathlete Magazine. She is an Ironman finisher, Boston-qualifying marathoner, certified Pilates instructor—and a fitness and nutrition enthusiast. You can read more about her on Susanegrant.com and follow her on Twitter at @susanglegacki.

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