Leaked blood tests reveal potential doping in Olympic and World Championship winners

What we know:

Over the weekend, several news organizations obtained thousands of blood tests from Olympic and World Championship winners in long-distance running. Results of the blood tests—conducted by the sport's governing body, IAAF—lead to allegations of doping among roughly one-third of medal winners between 2001 and 2012. The blood tests are said to have been leaked by a whistleblower set out to expose high levels of cheating in the sport.

What does the IAAF say?

Not much—yet. There is a statement on their website announcing that they are aware of the allegations and are preparing a full response. The association also pointed out that the blood test results were illegally obtained and they are prepared to take follow-up action against the party/parties at fault.

Who is on this list of alleged dopers?

We don't know names, but we do know that the documents included results from more than 5,000 athletes, with more than 800 of them showing "abnormal" results. Athletes from Russia made up the highest percentage of runners on the list, followed by Ukraine, Morocco, Spain, Kenya, Turkey and others.

What exactly does this mean?

That a large number of medal-winners were possibly cheating during the Olympics and World Championships for 11 years. Because the blood tests belonged to the IAAF, this points to allegations the association was well-aware of the use of banned substances and kept it under wraps.

What now?

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) and World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) will be conducting independent investigations into the allegations, and will act in accordance with their anti-doping policies based on the findings of those investigations. This can mean disqualification from past races, suspension from the sport for at least six months, temporary or permanent ineligibility and forfeiture of medals, points, prizes and/or titles.

More: The Solution to Doping in Sports

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About the Author

Erica Schuckies

Erica Schuckies is an online content editor for Active.com. After graduating from Colorado State University, she spent time working in the rodeo industry, followed by three years with Berkshire Hathaway's Business Wire. Erica enjoys fitness, running, hunting, fishing and being outdoors. Follow Erica on on Twitter, Instagram or Google+.

Erica Schuckies is an online content editor for Active.com. After graduating from Colorado State University, she spent time working in the rodeo industry, followed by three years with Berkshire Hathaway's Business Wire. Erica enjoys fitness, running, hunting, fishing and being outdoors. Follow Erica on on Twitter, Instagram or Google+.

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