4 Swimming Drills to Perfect Your Stroke

Swimming requires a lot of technique and training for your body to perform the way it needs to. One way to do this is to practice swimming drills. There is an endless supply of swimming drills that work on the common issues swimmers have with their stroke. Target the weakness in your stroke and then find the swimming drill that works for you.

Play Catch Up

Extending your body and your arms helps create a fluid stroke and get the maximum distance out of each stroke. While you can subconsciously shorten your arm strokes in an effort to move faster, it is important to lengthen your body while performing freestyle for this stroke to be fluid. The catch up drill will help you become aware of how you should be extending your arms during your stroke.

Begin with your standard freestyle kick and pull, then keep your left arm extended forward not moving until you pull with your right arm and return it to the extended position. Then pull with your left arm and repeat the move on the other side alternating as you swim down the lane. As the name implies, this drill done properly feels as though your right arm is catching up to your left before you can perform the next stroke and vice versa.

More: 3 Drills to Fix Your Swimming Stroke and Eliminate Drag

Drag Your Fingertips

The fingertip drag drill focuses on your arm position as you are recovering from each stroke. Dragging your fingertips across the top of the water as you recover from each pull forces you to control your arm movement. It also prevents you from wasting energy or moving your arms haphazardly after each stroke.

To do this drill, begin by swimming freestyle as usual, then after you pull under the water and begin to bring your arm back up, drag your fingers over along the top of the water as you return your hand to the start of the stroke position. Be sure to keep your elbows more parallel to the water. This drill helps bring awareness to your arm position during recovery.

More: 4 Tips for a Faster Freestyle

About the Author

Nicole Morell is a fitness writer, marketer, runner and swimmer.

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