6 Yoga Poses for a Stronger Core

When you think of core strength, you probably think of six-pack abs and millions of crunches. While these aesthetic feats can be the result of a strong core, they are not what define it. The core consists of more than just what you can see, and that's why you need to train in various ways for it to become truly well-rounded and strong.

There are six different muscle groups that define the core container:
  • Rectus Abdominus: The ever-elusive washboard abs are formally known as the rectus abdominus. This is the most superficial of the core muscles, meaning they are muscles you can feel through the skin and are the easiest to train.
  • Transverse Abdominus: We each begin our training with our own version of a champion weight belt. The transverse abdominus is a thick layer of muscle that wraps around our torso from front to back and provides our spine with the stability it needs during functional movements like squatting, running and lifting.
  • External/Internal Obliques: These two muscles differ slightly in function but not in location. The external oblique lies on top of the internal oblique, and together they fold and twist the torso during various movements.
  • Quadratus Lumborum: Did you know you have abdominals in your back? The quadratus lumborum is the deep-set muscle of the lower back and connects the torso and the pelvis.
  • Diaphragm: This muscle, which regulates the pressure in the thoracic cavity, pulls and pushes air in and out of the lungs. It is located at the bottom of the rib cage and is like the lid of the core container. The diaphragm contributes to overall core stability.
  • Pelvic Floor: Just as we need a lid for the core container, we also need a floor. The bottom of the core container is the pelvic floor. When we place a load on the spine, causing stress, the pelvic floor will lift to provide support.

There are a lot of ways to strengthen core muscles beyond crunches and squats, and yoga is definitely one of them. Each of the below movements and holds builds core strength that goes beyond the ability to do 1,000 crunches. These poses will activate your core container and target each muscle group to increase strength. 

About the Author

Stephanie Ring

Stephanie Ring is a certified yoga teacher, CrossFit coach, writer and creator of Endure Yoga. She's based in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she works at CrossFit Marin and Yoga Flow SF. She is a 500-Hour Registered Yoga Teacher through Yoga Alliance, a CrossFit Level 2 Coach, a CrossFit Mobility Trainer, a Team ICG Indoor Cycling Instructor and has her CPR/AED Certification. You can find Stephanie on her Endure Yoga website or on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Stephanie Ring is a certified yoga teacher, CrossFit coach, writer and creator of Endure Yoga. She's based in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she works at CrossFit Marin and Yoga Flow SF. She is a 500-Hour Registered Yoga Teacher through Yoga Alliance, a CrossFit Level 2 Coach, a CrossFit Mobility Trainer, a Team ICG Indoor Cycling Instructor and has her CPR/AED Certification. You can find Stephanie on her Endure Yoga website or on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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