Rage Against the Whatever: Angry Cyclist Videos

Type in the search term "cyclist" on YouTube and the autofill function will immediately give you "cyclist road rage." Click "Enter" and you'll see nearly 300,000 results of videos of cyclists and motorists yelling, gesturing, threatening and sometimes even going to blows in the middle of the street.

The steady progression of technology, including ANT+, Bluetooth and memory cards give us the ability to store and carry large amounts of data; the Internet allows us to share what we've captured with our portable cameras and smartphones.

Stir all this up with the advent of social media and you have a potent concoction.

More: Why Are Road Cyclists Rude?

Angry People

On one end of things, we have websites like Upworthy and TED that try to promote unique ideas—sometimes about cycling—in the interest of provoking thought and discussion. On the other end, we have TMZ and The Chive, which tend to focus more on the provocative and less on the thoughtful.

Twitter, YouTube and Facebook are somewhere in between. They're generally crowd controlled free-for-alls. No one is editing or filtering the content. It's all getting posted, raw and uncensored.

In effect, they constitute public spaces where we can do whatever we want. Which means the content we post somehow represents what it is we want to do. And the popularity of certain videos suggests that we want to do is be angry.

More: 10 Things I Learned From Being Hit by a Car

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About the Author

Jim Gourley

Jim Gourley is a four-time Ironman finisher and part of a four-man division that finished the Race Across America. He earned a degree in astronautical engineering from the United States Air Force Academy and has written on science and technology in triathlon for four years. He is author of the book Faster: Demystifying the Science of Triathlon Speed.

Jim Gourley is a four-time Ironman finisher and part of a four-man division that finished the Race Across America. He earned a degree in astronautical engineering from the United States Air Force Academy and has written on science and technology in triathlon for four years. He is author of the book Faster: Demystifying the Science of Triathlon Speed.

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