6 Triathlete Goals That'll Make You a Better Person

It may be a little late to discuss New Year's resolutions. But then again, triathletes are no strangers to odd timing and peculiar decisions.

Many are deep into base training, and they've had plenty of time to mull over the accomplishments of the previous year and plan the goals of the next. Despite this, there's often still an urge to partake in the tradition and come up with an extra idea for self-improvement.

There are more things triathletes can do beyond changing their diet or weekly mileage. Consider these possible resolutions to make your new year in triathlon the best one yet.

1. Spend more money on your body than on your bike

There are always upgrades you can find for your bike, but what about you? When was the last time you had a massage or visited a chiropractor? What about a yoga class?

We typically don't think about things like this until late in a race, when that one tight muscle turns into serious pain. This year, instead of those high-dollar wheels that will shed a minute or two on your bike split, try using that money on something that will provide extra hours of pain-free racing.

More: 9 Race-Week Nutrition Tips for Triathletes

2. Spend more time with your family than by yourself

This is a struggle many serious competitors face. People who win their age groups at races train harder than most, and it's an admirable effort. But too few of them realize what that time is taking away from.

There are plenty of articles that suggest athletes should set aside time for their kids or spouses, but that only indicates a symptom of a problem. You can't manage personal relationships like an interval training session. It's not reasonable to give a person an hour here and there and expect that to carry them through to the next date on the calendar you've scheduled for them.

Blocking out "times of availability" for your loved ones is no less selfish than blocking them out entirely. If you're one of those people who knows how many hours a week you spend training because you're constantly having to balance it against "competing demands," take a few extra moments to consider what's really important, and if your approach is more about you than your loved ones.

More: 5 Ways to Juggle Triathlon and Family

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About the Author

Jim Gourley

Jim Gourley is a four-time Ironman finisher and part of a four-man division that finished the Race Across America. He earned a degree in astronautical engineering from the United States Air Force Academy and has written on science and technology in triathlon for four years. He is author of the book Faster: Demystifying the Science of Triathlon Speed.

Jim Gourley is a four-time Ironman finisher and part of a four-man division that finished the Race Across America. He earned a degree in astronautical engineering from the United States Air Force Academy and has written on science and technology in triathlon for four years. He is author of the book Faster: Demystifying the Science of Triathlon Speed.

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