3 Ways to Set Effective Running Goals for the New Year

Most runners have a general idea of what they want to accomplish with their running. Maybe they want to get faster, lose weight or try a longer race. Unfortunately, many runners don't always set effective racing and performance goals and, as a result, they fail..

Goal setting can be a daunting and complicated process, but it doesn't have to be. So, let's boil it down to the basics to help you get determine exactly what you want to accomplish in the new year.

Identifying your top ambition, setting realistic stretch goals and focusing on the process are three critical steps to setting running objectives that clarify your mission and motivate you to perform at your best.

1) Identify Your No. 1 Goal

It could be as simple as increasing your weekly mileage, trying a longer race, or shaving some time off your 5K. Regardless of what you decide, you have to want it badly. Your success will depend, in part, on having a strong desire to achieve your goal. So, think about what is most important to you right now and why.

Be honest with yourself because a good goal is one that will motivate you. Don't come up with a goal that you think you should have. Instead, set a goal that you know you'll pursue relentlessly because you want to. Also, make sure that your goal is personal, with an emotional connection that will help sustain you when the going gets tough.

More: Do Your Running Goals Match Your Reason for Running?

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About the Author

Jason Fitzgerald

Jason Fitzgerald is a USATF-certified running coach, 2:39 marathoner, and the founder of Strength Running. Have a question about running? Download the free Strength Running PR Guide to get 35+ answers to the most commonly asked questions about running.

Jason Fitzgerald is a USATF-certified running coach, 2:39 marathoner, and the founder of Strength Running. Have a question about running? Download the free Strength Running PR Guide to get 35+ answers to the most commonly asked questions about running.

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