Are These 4 Popular Diets Worth It?

Diet Trends

Nutrition can be confusing.

It feels like the health world is constantly changing its mind on what’s okay to eat and what’s not. Celebrities, popular culture and even social media can push along nutrition crazes that aren’t so great for us. Remember fat-free diets? Yikes!

There are numerous eating plans on the market right now, and though many share some general ideas (nobody is turning down leafy greens), they still differ in major ways.

We break down some of the current nutrition crazes and whether or not they’ll serve your health long-term.

Paleo/Whole30

Also known as, “Eat like the cavemen,” this diet advocates a lot of meat, vegetables, nuts, seeds and fruit. You won’t be hungry on this nutrition path, but the high-quality ingredients may be pricey. 

You’ll need to keep your fridge fully stocked and be prepared to do lots of home cooking, as not all restaurants are “paleo friendly.” Also, there are differing versions of this diet, like eating all organic versus not.

Worth It?

It gets you cooking and using high-quality ingredients that aren’t processed, unlike a typical American diet. It can be difficult to follow, though, as the diet excludes some significant nutrients, so take it easy on yourself and modify this one to your lifestyle and nutritional needs.

Gluten-free

About one percent of the population suffers from Celiac Disease, and a growing number of people are gluten-intolerant in some form. Cutting out wheat and introducing more meat, vegetables and substitutes like almond flour helps you feel fuller and supplies your body with more nutrients. Plus, its popularity makes the gluten-free diet highly accessible, and most restaurants now carry some type of gluten-free menu.

Worth It?

Going gluten-free can be extremely helpful and necessary for some, but this one isn’t for everyone. Deciding to cut out wheat completely from your diet without consulting your doctor may not be the best move. Also, watch out for all the “gluten free” packaging claims in your grocery stores. Many contain even more harmful or bloating substitutes that aren’t good for anyone. For those who are especially sensitive, beware that not all restaurants practice proper gluten-free cooking practices, and wheat can easily contaminate other food.

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About the Author

Joan Khalaf

Joan Khalaf writes nutrition articles for ACTIVE.com. As a health and wellness blogger based in Dallas, Texas, she has been inspired by her own journey of full mental and physical recovery. Joan is a devout yogi, dog lover and self-love advocate. You can read about her health journey here.

Joan Khalaf writes nutrition articles for ACTIVE.com. As a health and wellness blogger based in Dallas, Texas, she has been inspired by her own journey of full mental and physical recovery. Joan is a devout yogi, dog lover and self-love advocate. You can read about her health journey here.

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