College Recruiting Tip No.1: NCAA Eligibility

Michael Husted played professional football for eight years as a placekicker in the NFL. He is also the co-creator of activerecruiting.com, now ACTIVE.com/camps, an innovative online video recruiting tool that connects student athletes with coaches through the use of interactive video profiles.

So you want to play sports in college? Whether you're an All-American, All- State, All- District or just a starter because you were left off those lists by mistake, in order to play at the next level there are mandatory procedures.

The NCAA considers a Prospective Student-Athlete as "someone who is looking to participate in intercollegiate athletics at an NCAA Division I or Division II institution in the future." To play in college ALL Prospective Student-Athletes must sign up with the NCAA Eligibility Center.

As of August 1, 2008, NCAA Division I will require 16 core courses. Division II requires 14 core courses, but will increase to 16 core courses beginning August 1, 2013. View the NCAA Freshman Eligibility Standards Quick Reference Sheet for more information on these requirements.

This important step allows for college coaches to verify that you are eligible and provides them academic information on the student-athlete. You are encouraged to submit transcripts and test scores (SAT/ACT) for their review. You will be assigned a pin number that they can use to confirm this information.

Just like there are rules to follow in games, the NCAA is all about rules and guidelines to better serve student-athletes and their parents.

Once you have registered, it is time to let them know that you are out there. The internet is a great way to create exposure. Creating an online interactive video profile is a solid way to make that all important introduction to college coaches.

If you haven't registered with the eligibility center, do so ASAP.

Next:College Recruiting Tip No. 2: Choosing a College

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