How to Maintain Your Health Throughout Fall and Winter

A woman exercising.

There's a reason why spring and summer are often referred to as swimsuit season.

Each year, many of us put a strong focus on our health and fitness during the warm months. We (hopefully) make gains and improvements, and reap the benefits by proudly trotting around in our swimsuits.

When the seasons shift, however, it's common for many of us to lose our desire to maintain our recently improved health. Some are lucky to have warm weather year-round, but for many, the climate shifts to cold and gray, a serious de-motivating factor for exercise.

It's difficult to keep the same workout regimen when fall arrives, but this doesn't mean you should lose hope. Instead, try establishing a workout program focused on maintenance rather than gains and improvements.

More: How to Create a No-Fail Fall Workout Plan

Change Your Mindset

If your normal exercise trend is to work out hard in spring and summer and relax in the fall in winter, you're likely to encounter issues eventually.

Over time, it can be increasingly difficult to lose the weight you've gained in the colder months. You can lose some or most of it, but the rest will be tough to shed, and one day, you may find yourself 50 pounds heavier than your normal weight.

If you do your best to maintain your fitness, however, this doesn't have to be the case.

What Can You Do?

It's important to set realistic goals on which aspects of your health you want to maintain.

If you're having trouble finding time to exercise, even in your home, try finding ways to make your diet healthier than normal. If you're only able to exercise two days per week, focus on the quality of the workout over the quantity.

Try creating a meal schedule you'll follow each week. Determine what's on your daily menu and when you'll be eating it. Print it out for everyone to see, and use it as a daily reminder to stay committed.

When it comes to exercise, know what types of workouts you'll be performing on specific days and which exercises, sets, reps and time sequences you're aiming for. Don't wing it—put some extra thought in to what you want to do.

More: Why You Should Add Variation to Your Fitness Plan

  • 1
  • of
  • 2
NEXT

About the Author

Kisar S. Dhillon

Kisar S. Dhillon is a professional fitness trainer living in Portland, Oregon. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Kinesiology, Post Baccalaureate Studies in Exercise Physiology and a Master's in Business Administration. He has more than 17 years experience in the health and fitness industry and is currently the owner of The Art of Personal Training. You can follow him on Google Plus, Twitter and on YouTube.

Kisar S. Dhillon is a professional fitness trainer living in Portland, Oregon. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Kinesiology, Post Baccalaureate Studies in Exercise Physiology and a Master's in Business Administration. He has more than 17 years experience in the health and fitness industry and is currently the owner of The Art of Personal Training. You can follow him on Google Plus, Twitter and on YouTube.

Discuss This Article