Get Ready for Winter Sports With Active Stretching

Are you thinking about the winter sports? Tight muscles, cramped joints and a lethargic body is not how you want to ring in this winter season. Instead, prepare your body for sledding adventures, skiing moguls and family snowball fights by introducing stretching into your overall health and fitness routine. Don't worry, you don't have to schedule tons of time to make stretching beneficial and effective. Just ten minutes will do the trick.

Start With the Basics

When incorporating stretching into your workout, take a two-phased approach. The first phase should focus on preparing your body, joints, heart and lungs for a dynamic workout. The second phase should focus on cooling down your muscles and preparing your body for an active recovery following your workout. In essence, it is most effective to sandwich your strength and conditioning workout routine with two short, but effective, active stretching routines.

Phase One: Warm Up and Dynamic Stretch

If touching your toes and taking deep breaths to start your workout is your idea of warming up and stretching, then you are missing out on an excellent opportunity to set yourself up for a great workout. According to research by The National Strength and Condition Association, passive static stretching can lead to reduced performance when compared to an active, dynamic warm-up alone.  

A great workout starts with a great warm-up so the first step to an active warm-up that is going to increase your performance is spending a few minutes on a foam roller. The purpose of the foam roller is provide soft tissue flexibility in preparation for a more fluid and free-moving workout. The few  minutes it takes to foam roll will pay dividends for the remainder of your fitness session.

After you've established more flexible muscles with the foam roller, the next step is to prepare your body for elevating heart rates and getting down to business. The warm-up should not be easy. It should start easy, but then progress to the point that when you're finished five minutes later, you're ready to go full steam ahead into your workout.

A dynamic warm-up should include explosive movements such as high knees, skipping and moving lunges. It is important to remember that the purpose of these types of exercises is to prepare your joints and ligaments for the high intensity portion of your workout. Make sure not to push yourself too hard, but instead focus on starting slow and revving up your body for an effective and dynamic workout.

Phase Two: Cool Down and Recovery

After you've left all of your effort, sweat and tears on the gym floor during your high intensity strength and conditioning workout, it is now time to take three to five minutes to incorporate some light stretching and cool down techniques to finish off your fitness routine. The purpose of this stretching phase is to loosen up any knots that might build up in your muscle fibers during your workout and prepare your body for proper recovery that will last hours after your workout has ended.

It is important to stretch the major muscle groups you exercised during your workout and to focus on any problem spots that you may have. Some simple, but highly effective cool down and recovery stretches include the child's pose, lower leg lunge stretches and the cat stretch for your back and shoulders.

If stretching is typically an after-thought for you during your workouts, focus on incorporating these ten minutes of pre- and post-workout stretches this winter to prepare your body for optimal performance during and after your workouts.

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Denver Budget Recreation Examiner Gretchen Yoder is a contributor to the Denver Post's is the inside source for everything local. Powered by Examiners, the largest pool of knowledgeable and passionate contributors in the world, we provide unique and original content to enhance life in your local city wherever that may be.

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