10 Things That Can Get in the Way of Your Fitness Goals

Coaches and personal trainers work with a wide range of fitness levels. But whether it's a first-time gym-goer or an athlete who's vying for an Olympic slot, the same training principles are often used. Although the training load and specific workouts are different, the ideology is the same.

The first thing trainers and coaches often do when they start working with someone is identify things that might get in the way of his or her success. Distractions and potential roadblocks are important to look for, because these are often what facilitate problems.

Here are 10 things that can hold you back or get in the way of your physical growth.

1. Negative Thoughts

If you fill your head with negative thoughts about your physical abilities, it's almost impossible to succeed. Whether your goals include a spot on a winner's podium spot or a simply better health, you success requires positive thinking.

2. Support System Failure

If your friends and family don't support your fitness goals, it's difficult to succeed. Let them know why being active is important to you and your long-term health. Try to include them in creative ways so they're involved in your health endeavors.

More: How to Find Friends With (Fitness) Benefits

3. No Routine

If you only fit exercise into your life when you have the time for it, without making it a priority, other things can take priority. Consistency is the most important foundation for fitness. This means scheduling an appointment to exercise a certain number of days or hours each week. There will be occasions when you can't keep a fitness appointment, but those occasions should be rare.

4. Boredom

If your fitness routine has become boring and uninspiring, it's unlikely to last. Take a risk and do something that's different; something that has you excited for what's next. Convince a few friends to take on a new challenge with you. Adventure loves company.

5. Monotony

An exercise routine is critical to establishing fitness, but the same routine over a long period of time can lead to burning out. Even if you don't plan to do a new activity, change your routine regularly to keep it interesting. Take a rest-and-recovery week every three or four weeks.

After building a solid foundation, change the intensity of your workouts. Include a few fast-paced intervals during your workout—something as simple as alternating 30 seconds of an accelerating speed and 90 seconds of an easy pace can make a difference.

More: Interval Workouts That Fire Up Your Metabolism

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About the Author

Gale Bernhardt

Gale Bernhardt was the USA Triathlon team coach at the 2003 Pan American Games and 2004 Athens Olympics. She's worked as one of the few World Cup coaches and delivered coached education training for the Triathlon Union's Sport Development Team. She has coached Olympic road racers, World Cup mountain bike riders and Leadville 100 racers. Thousands of athletes have had successful training and racing experiences using Gale's ready-to-use, easy-to-follow training plans.

Gale Bernhardt was the USA Triathlon team coach at the 2003 Pan American Games and 2004 Athens Olympics. She's worked as one of the few World Cup coaches and delivered coached education training for the Triathlon Union's Sport Development Team. She has coached Olympic road racers, World Cup mountain bike riders and Leadville 100 racers. Thousands of athletes have had successful training and racing experiences using Gale's ready-to-use, easy-to-follow training plans.

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