5 Ways to Recover From Post-Tour de France Syndrome

If you are like me, you are going through Tour de France withdrawal. After three weeks of non-stop, live (yeah!) coverage of the world's greatest bike race, all of a sudden there is a huge, and I mean cavernous, void left as Paris fades into the distance.

There is actually some sort of post-March Madness syndrome documented by medical experts. This is the cycling equivalent to the basketball phenomenon. Basically, it sucks! Yeah, we all live for the drama of the big mountain stages at the Tour, but let's face it, by the end of the race even the flattest stage where you know the day will end in a field sprint can raise your blood pressure by double digits.

More: How Watching the Tour de France Might Make You Faster

Ride More

What to do. What to do. Well, obviously, one thing you can do is get out there and ride your bike. If the Tour doesn't motivate you to ride and, better yet, up your game to another level, then check for a pulse. Riding the wave of the Tour (yeah, I know, bad pun) is a great way to get in shape for that summer century or charity ride.

Buy a Pro Kit

If you have a favorite team from the Tour, go out and get the jersey so you can wear it and show your support. They say the yellow jersey gives the wearer wings. Sporting your favorite team's strip (that's British for 'kit,' which is also another British term for 'jersey') can give you wings as well! OK, so it's pretty hard to confuse us with Chris Froome, but hey, those dudes look cool in their strip and you can too.

More: Rules to Ride by at the Tour de France

One word of caution for those who choose to wear a team's kit: It's great to show your support for your favorite team, but lose the attitude. That's reserved for the guys who get that stuff, as well as a team bike, for free. By the way, all the pros I have ever met had no attitude though they could ride circles around me, so take note to lose the attitude.

Get a Magazine

Of course, you can relive the Tour by reading the recaps in all the cycling magazines. They usually have great photos of scenes potentially missed by the TV cameras and in-depth interviews with the key players that most likely didn't fit into a TV sound bite. The British magazines tend to go a bit overboard for the likes of Froome and Wiggins, but we all remember the big play Lance got in the US-based publications, so that's not such a big deal.

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About the Author

Bruce Hildenbrand

Bruce Hildenbrand's writings have appeared in Outside, Bicycling, Cycle Sport, VeloNews and a host of other cycling and outdoor-related magazines and websites. His assignments have taken him to such prestigious events as the Tour de France, Tour of Italy, Tour of Spain, Tour of Switzerland, Paris-Roubaix, Tour of Flanders, the World Road Championships, the World Track Championships and the World CycloCross Championships.

Bruce Hildenbrand's writings have appeared in Outside, Bicycling, Cycle Sport, VeloNews and a host of other cycling and outdoor-related magazines and websites. His assignments have taken him to such prestigious events as the Tour de France, Tour of Italy, Tour of Spain, Tour of Switzerland, Paris-Roubaix, Tour of Flanders, the World Road Championships, the World Track Championships and the World CycloCross Championships.

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