What You Should and Shouldn't Eat Before a Workout

Choose a Low-Fiber Carb Instead

Carbohydrates are digested relatively quickly. They break down quickly and can be utilized as fuel for your workout. It's a great way to produce immediate energy, while leaving glycogen, or energy reserves, intact.

If you're working out within 30 to 60 minutes of eating, go for a 100-calorie snack comprised mostly of carbs.

Try one of these:

  • 1 ounce of pretzels
  • 3/4 cup blueberries
  • 1 cup strawberries
  • 1 small to medium banana
  • 10 to12 whole grain crackers
  • 1 cup Cheerios 
  • 1 cup melon
  • 1 small box of raisins
  • 3/4 cups Puffins cereal
  • 1 medium to large kiwi
  • 1/2 of a medium baked potato
  • 1 medium apple or orange
  • 3 tablespoons dried cherries
  • 2 medium figs
  • 1 cup vegetable soup
  • 3 tablespoons of cranberry sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups watermelon
  • 40 whole wheat goldfish crackers
  • 1 cup frozen grapes
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce

With a few simple nutrition adjustments, you'll feel more energetic, get more out of your workouts, and see better results from exercising. Your car can't run on inefficient fuel; don't ask your body to do it.

More: How to Fuel During and After a Workout

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About the Author

Jennifer Vimbor

Jennifer Vimbor, MS, RD, LDN, is the founder of Nutrition Counseling Services in downtown Chicago. An avid runner, marathoner and triathlete, Jennifer has first-hand knowledge of the nutritional needs of athletes, and has been helping athletes reach their goals since 2003. She was the nutritionist for the New York Runners Only Club, and has worked with Chicago Area Runners Association. Jennifer advises athletes, from novice to professional, in groups and privately. Find Jennifer on Facebook, and follow her on Twitter.

Jennifer Vimbor, MS, RD, LDN, is the founder of Nutrition Counseling Services in downtown Chicago. An avid runner, marathoner and triathlete, Jennifer has first-hand knowledge of the nutritional needs of athletes, and has been helping athletes reach their goals since 2003. She was the nutritionist for the New York Runners Only Club, and has worked with Chicago Area Runners Association. Jennifer advises athletes, from novice to professional, in groups and privately. Find Jennifer on Facebook, and follow her on Twitter.

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