4 Exercises to Prevent Back Pain From Cycling

Extend your left fingertips forward and squeeze your left gluteus. Hold this extension for 5 seconds before slowly returning to the starting position. Continue alternating sides until you have completed 10 repetitions on each side.

Prone Snow Angels

Lie face down on a mat with your arms extended along your sides (palms down). Gently squeeze your glutes and begin to raise your feet, chest and hands off the ground. Don't lift your feet more than 6 inches. Create a "snow angel" by sweeping your arms overhead and separating your feet. Without bending your arms, try to bring your hands together above your head. Return to starting position, take a deep breath, and repeat until you have completed 10 to 15 repetitions.

Shoulder Blade Squeeze

Start on your hands and knees. Place your hands directly below your shoulders as if you were going to do a push-up. Keep your arms straight and drop your shoulder blades down, squeezing the lower edges together. Don't let your low back sway or your chin push forward. Hold the shoulder blade squeeze for 5 seconds and release. Take a breath, then continue to repeat this 5-second hold until you have completed 10 repetitions.

More: 8 Single-Leg Exercises to Increase Power

Time Trial Position (Plank Hold)

The TT Hold is performed on your forearms and toes. The exercise is isometric and there should be no movement. Keep your elbows directly beneath your shoulders, and your feet should be 8 to 10 inches apart. Keep the back of your neck long and look down at the floor.

Work to bring your shoulder blades onto your back by squeezing them together slightly. Your lower back should not be excessively rounded, and your neck should be long (don't look up). Hold this position for 20 to 30 seconds. As you become stronger, extend the hold time.

For additional exercises and routines to help with low back pain, pick up a copy of Tom Danielson's Core Advantage: Core Strength for Cycling's Winning Edge.

More: 5 Exercises to Improve Cycling Speed

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